7D 6N Itinerary in Seoul | carol_herbert

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carol_herbert

Many of you that are following would know i travel a lot and had done so many reviews based on what i experienced and encounter with.

Here is the summary of my travel experiences in Korea for week. You will have to click in the links to read on more . Traveling in Korea is a one major decision i made. I hope some of the places I went and explored could help some of you travelers. I blog for fun and always write straight forward.

Day 1

Korea Day 1: Chungmuro Station + Come On Guesthouse + Namsan Tower

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https://caroljeyakumar.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/korea-day-1-chungmuro-station-come-on-guesthouse-namsan-tower/

Day 2

Korea Day 2 : Gyeongbokgung Palace + Bukchon Hanok Village + Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park

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https://caroljeyakumar.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/korea-day-2-gyeongbokgung-palace-bukchon-hanok-village-dongdaemun-design-plaza-park/

Day 3 + 4

Korea Day 3 + 4 : Jeonju + Hanok Village + Happy Memory

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https://caroljeyakumar.wordpress.com/2017/05/05/korea-day-3-4-jeonju-hanok-village-happy-memory/

Day 5

Korea Day 5 : Nami Island + Petite France

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https://caroljeyakumar.wordpress.com/2017/05/11/korea-day-5-nami-island-petite-france/

Day 6

Korea Day 6 : Lotte World

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https://caroljeyakumar.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/korea-day-6-lotte-world/

Day 7

Korea Day 7 : Incheon International Airport 

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pack and head back home 🙂

Please do share your stories with me . I would love to hear from you and your amazing journey on what different experiences you had. It will be fun !

For more viewing, you can check out my instagram : www.instagram.com/carol_herbert

The end 🙂

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Train to Busan

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A must to watch. This is the review from Roger Ebert. It is a hit in the Asia Marker for now. I dare you to watch it.

Seok-woo (Gong Yoo) is a divorced workaholic. He lives with his mother and barely spends any time with his daughter Su-an (Kim Su-an). He’s so distant from her that he buys her a Nintendo Wii for her birthday, ignoring that she has one already, and that he’s the one who bought it for her for Children’s Day. To make up for this rather-awkward moment, he agrees to give Su-an what she really wants—a trip to her mother’s home in Busan, 280 miles away. It’s just an hour train ride from Seoul. What could possibly go wrong? Even the set-up is a thematic beauty, as this is more than just a train ride for Seok-woo and Su-an—it’s a journey into the past as a father tries to mend bridges and fix that which may be dead. It’s a perfect setting for a zombie movie.

Before they even get to their early-morning train ride, Seok-woo and Su-an see a convoy of emergency vehicles headed into Seoul. When they get to the train, Sang-ho beautifully sets up his cast of characters, giving us beats with the conductors, a pair of elderly sisters, a husband and his pregnant wife, an obnoxious businessman (a vision of Seok-woo in a couple of decades), and even a baseball team. A woman who’s clearly not well gets on the train just before it departs, and just as something else disturbing but generally unseen is happening in the station above the platform. Before you know it, the woman is taking out the jugular of a conductor, who immediately becomes a similarly mindless killing machine. These are zombies of the “28 Days Later” variety—fast, focused, and violent. They replicate like a virus, turning whole cars of the train into dead-eyed flesh-eaters in a matter of seconds. They are rabid dogs. And you thought your Metra commute was bad.

The claustrophobic tension of “Train to Busan” is amplified after a brilliantly staged sequence in a train station in which our surviving travelers learn that the entire country has gone brain-hungry. They discover that the undead can’t quite figure out, door handles and are mostly blind, so tunnels and lines of sight become essential. Sang-ho also keeps up his social commentary, giving us characters who want to do anything to survive, and others who will do what it takes to save others. Early in the film, Seok-woo tells his daughter, “At a time like this, only watch out for yourself,” but he learns that this isn’t the advice we should live by or pass down to our children. Without spoiling anything, the survivors of “Train to Busan” are only so lucky because of the sacrifice of others. And the film is thematically stronger than your average zombie flick in the way it captures how panic can make monsters of us all, and it is our responsibility to overcome that base instinct in times of crisis.

After the near-perfect first hour of “Train to Busan,” the film slows its progress and makes a few stops that feel repetitive, but the journey recovers nicely for a memorable finale. You could call it “Train of the Living Dead” or “’Snowpiercer’ with Zombies.” Whatever you call it, if it’s playing in your city and you’ve ever been entertained by a zombie movie, it’s hard to believe you wouldn’t be entertained by this one.

So yeah, have fun scary people.